Expert says increasing climate change led to prolonged harmattan

Expert says increasing climate change led to prolonged harmattan

 

An environmentalist, Mr Emmanuel Emechete, has said that the current extended harmattan and misty season is associated with the growing climate change effects.

Emechete told newsmen in Lagos on Monday that the extended harmattan season affected numerous sectors in the country.

According to Emechete, the harmattan hazy dust is due to major climate change shift being witnessed around the world.

“The signs are all around us already. Regarding the environment, the haze has affected the number of flights from one local airport to another; while most flights were cancelled last week due to poor visibility.

“We should not be witnessing this dusty atmosphere at this time of the year. The weather has also altered the schedule of farming activities in the country.

 

READ ALSO: Healthy tips for protecting children during harmattan

 

“The dust haze has effects across all sectors from the environment; to agriculture and most especially human health.

“What we are witnessing is actually a climate change effect on the environment; so we need step up actions to mitigate it by living sustainably,’’ he said.

Emechete also noted the agricultural implications of the hazy environment; and what it portends for productivity.

He said the implication of the extended harmattan season were also health-related; owing to the increasing dust particulates in the environment.

“Once these dust particles are formed in the environment; it affects our respiratory system which also results in a lot of respiratory problems.

 

READ ALSO: Harmattan: Tips for healthy skin

 

“These air particulates can also result in the transmission and spread of most airborne diseases; there are some diseases like common fever, congested nostrils and catarrh connected to the season.

“There some crops that need to be cultivated during the period but actually delayed; and if the farmer goes ahead to plant, the crops may not do well.

“The crops will not produce as much as they should because of the extended harmattan season,” Emechete said.

About The Author

Olanike Akinrimisi

Humanitarian reporter, writer and author 1stnews.com olanike.akinrimisi@1stnews.com

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