How to check if your personal data was leaked in the recent Facebook breach

How to check if your personal data was leaked in the recent Facebook breach

Last week, a user dumped personal details of over 533 million Facebook users on a hacking forum. These details included Facebook IDs, phone numbers, names, locations, birthdates and even email addresses.

Legally, companies are required to notify users when their data has been leaked. However, we have seen companies make vague statements and empty promises about data security in the past. As such, more often than not, users don’t know if their data has been leaked; or they don’t know how to check if their data was a part of a recent breach.

Fortunately, security researchers work tirelessly to make sure users know when their privacy has been breached; or if they have been a victim of a data breach. One such researcher is Troy Hunt who runs the popular HaveIBeenPwned service. Hunt recently took to Twitter to confirm the data breach and he also noted that Facebook’s latest breach has been updated on HaveIBeenPwned. As such, you can visit HaveIBeenPwned and enter your email ID associated with your Facebook account to check if your data was leaked during the breach.

Also Read: Facebook confirms it won’t restock the Oculus Rift S VR headset in stores

Earlier today, Hunt also published a blog post noting that over 500 million phone numbers were leaked in the latest breach. He also talked a bit about why phone numbers were initially not added to HaveIBeenPwned; and what made him change his mind. He noted that only a few million email addresses were leaked in the latest breach; so the service was not giving acccurate results to people. As such he has also added an option to search records using phone numbers. To do that, you need to visit HaveIBeenPwned; and enter the phone number linked to your Facebook account to check if they were leaked during the data breach.

There’s over 500M phone numbers but only a few million email addresses so >99% of people were getting a “miss” when they should have gotten a “hit”. The phone numbers were easy to parse out from (mostly) well-formatted files. They were also all normalised into a nice consistent format with a country code. In short, this data set completely turned all my reasons for not doing this on its head.

This was not Facebook’s first data breach and sadly it won’t be the last. The sensible thing to do is to secure your Facebook account; and make sure you are using Two Factor Authentication on all your accounts. Unfortunately, if your data was part of the Facebook data breach then there is nothing you can do now; as the data is out in the open. What you can do, however, is to make sure that you change your Facebook password; and don’t use that password again.

About The Author

Kingsley Alaribe is a Digital Marketer with 1stNews, and writes the weekly column, Strangers and Lovers. He is also a Data Scientist. Email: [email protected]

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