Iran says hijab law is under review, as state media dismisses claims feared morality police has been abolished

Iran says hijab law is under review, as state media dismisses claims feared morality police has been abolished

Iran’s Attorney General Mohammad Jafar Montazeri stated on Thursday that the judiciary and parliament in Iran are reconsidering the country’s mandatory hijab law.

Montazeri was also reported as saying that Iran’s dreaded morality police had been “abolished”; but Iranian official media vehemently refuted the claims. They argued that the interior ministry, not the judiciary, is in charge of the unit.

Under Islamic law, which the morality police uphold, women in Iran are currently required to cover their heads in public. The laws around the head covering sparked a nationwide protest movement after the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini. She died in police custody after being apprehended by the morality police allegedly for not wearing her hijab properly.

Her passing on September 16 struck a chord throughout the Islamic Republic; and well-known public figures, including renowned Iranian actor Taraneh Alidoosti, came out in support of the cause.

Read more: USA vs Iran: Why it is more than a football match

Amini’s death served as the catalyst for a wave of widespread protests that have since revolved on a number of complaints against the government. Authorities have launched a deadly crackdown on protesters; and there have been claims of forced arrests and detentions and physical violence directed at the nation’s Kurdish minority.

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